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Conservatory Tips: Location and Style

If the Great British Summer has left you feeling disappointed so far, don’t despair! A conservatory is a great way to bring the outside in, and vice versa. It allows you to enjoy the bright summer light and vibrant garden while being protected from the elements.

A well-selected, high-quality conservatory can be enjoyed all year around. It offers valuable additional square footage to your property, without costing a fortune, and can considerably increase the value of your home. Before you commit to adding a conservatory, it is important that you know the options available to you. We asked one of our trusted traders, Leicester-based Kettell Windows, the key things that you need to consider when choosing a conservatory. This week, we look at location and style.

Location

The main focus of a conservatory should be your garden. Find the best view from your house and, if possible, choose that as the location of your conservatory. Ideally, you need to build your conservatory from an existing doorway to allow for access to the house. If you are a sun worshiper, make sure that you think about when you will use the conservatory and how much sun you want. For morning use, aim for east-facing, for afternoon and evening, choose west-facing. Ideally, if you want all-day sunshine, opt for a south-facing conservatory. If in doubt, choose a spot and pay attention to how much sunlight it gets before you make your decision. Your choice of location will dictate some elements of your conservatory: north-facing may need extra heating in the winter, while south-facing might need reflective glass to prevent it from overheating in the summer.

The Style

Your style of conservatory will depend on several things: the size that you want, the style of your home, your taste and your budget. Edwardian or Victorian conservatories are perfect for period properties; by adding one of these to your home, you will give the feel of a period orangery in keeping with the building’s original architecture, rather than a modern addition to the existing structure. The pitched roofs offer a feeling of grandeur and provide a light, airy feel. Gable ended conservatories are not dissimilar to the period style, but they have a gable end. This adds a striking silhouette when viewed from the outside and is great for imposing properties and modern properties. Finally, the humble lean-to conservatory is a favourite among many for several reasons. Perfect in areas where you are limited for space and budget, the lean-to conservatory is suitable for most buildings (including bungalows) and due to the lack of brickwork, it is very quick to erect.

Excited about your new project? Check out trusted conservatory installers near you or follow us on Facebook or Twitter for next week’s instalment.

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